Tag Archives: decorating the home

Wall Decorating Tip By Charmean Neithart: Abstract Art for Every Style Interior

By:  Published December 17, 2012

I wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard someone say, “Abstract art wouldn’t look good in my house.” I’d have a lot of dollars. It’s a common misconception that abstract art works only with a modern aesthetic. Although it does look great in modern settings, it can light up the most traditional of interiors as well.

One of my objectives in designing a room is to expose clients to things they wouldn’t intuitively consider. My experience is that when clients do step outside their comfort zone, they are thrilled with the outcome. Abstract art is a bit outside that zone for many. Here are some tips for incorporating it into your home, if you haven’t done so already.

Photo by Glenn Gissler Design – Discover living room design inspiration

This beautiful abstract piece gives this living room a fresh perspective. It contrasts the traditional elements for a perfect transitional blend. Notice that all the pattern is provided by the art, while the palette is repeated in the textiles.

Abstract art has a great ability to set a mood. For that reason, it is a perfect backdrop for contemplative spaces like bedrooms and sitting rooms.

Abstract art can help establish a palette. Take color cues from your abstract piece by repeating a color in fabrics or lighting.

An abstract piece can cut the heavy ornamentation of traditional pieces in half. By pairing this very traditional rococo console table with abstract art, the table feels fresh and not too old fashioned.… Read Full Article

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Wall Decorating Tip By Pangaea: 10 Design Strategies for Art Lovers

By: Pangaea Published June 9, 2011

 

This Ideabook is for art lovers. Artists get into a real tizzy about the subject of people looking for art-to-match-the-sofa. Coming from a background as an artist, I always encourage my interior design clients to select art first if they don’t have any so they feel free to buy what they love and not worry about what it goes with. And then we can plan the decor around the art.

I’m sure I’ll get an irate artist or two commenting here. I’ve spoken with some artists who feel the art completely stands on its own and should have nothing to do with the decor. Here’s the simple fact. No matter how irritated artists get by the subject of art-matching-the-sofa, your art will always look better and have greater impact in the space when the decor supports the art. Here are techniques you can use in your decor to support your art and make it even better.

 

Photo by Tracy Murdock Allied ASID – More living room photos

1. Repetition of color and line. This art is so well supported by this room. The strong black-and-white graphic image is echoed in the black-and-white upholstery with lines that are similar to the curves in the woman’s face. Even with the bright yellow accents in the room, the art is still the standout.

Repeating color from the art increases its impact in the room. Here, the green bed pillows pull their color from the art. Without them, the art doesn’t feel quite as strong. Try it! Put your finger just over the pillows in the picture. Having that bit of green on the bed to echo the color visually strengthens the art.

The undulating lines of the vases on this table pick up the shapes from the painting and increases its visual interest.

There are a lot of ways to repeat the lines in art. This dining table emulates the curves and the color of the center of the painting. The floral display brings in more of the color.

 

Photo by Dillard Pierce Design Associates – More family room ideas

 

2. Balance of color. This art has a lot of black with just a little bit of red. The black sofa with just a little red pillow keeps the same balance of colors as the art. Carrying that balance of color though the furnishings spreads the influence of the painting

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Wall Decorating Tip By Ian Stallings: 5 Ways Art Can Improve Your Room Design

Published by Ian Stallings March 16, 2015

As an interior designer with a fine arts background and an active painter, I find artwork to be the most important element of a room. An equal part of what I do, along with construction, project management and furniture design, is curate art and antiques collections for my clients. Artwork can often make or break a space. Below are five things artwork can do for your room.

Photo by Marylou Sobel Interior Design – More contemporary living room ideas

1. Add movement. Artwork can be used to introduce movement into a room. Movement is used in the art world as a way for the artist to direct where the viewer’s eye goes and to influence the viewer’s perception. Using a piece of art that conveys a lot of movement can help create a rhythm between the art and your furniture, with the lines creating the type of movement that translates into a story.

The conveyed movement within a piece of art can be reflected in your furniture choices to create an imaginative and original design. In the room here, the form in the ink drawing by Topher Delaney relates to the vintage driftwood cocktail table, keeping the eye moving through the space.

2. Provide color. Artwork can be used to dictate or enhance a color palette. If you’re feeling stuck with your design, try selecting a piece of artwork that fits the space and create a color palette influenced by the work. Pull accent colors for decorative objects from the secondary, or less seen, colors in the work to enhance different elements of the piece.

A neutral color palette can be utilized to showcase a favorite piece of art. A bright artwork can also be used to enrich and add color to an otherwise neutral palette. The juxtaposition between bold pops of color and crisp white walls creates an eye-catching effect. ….To Read More

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Wall Decorating Tips from Laura Gaskill: An Art-Buying Guide for Beginners

Photo by Caitlin Wilson Design – Look for eclectic kids’ room design inspiration

Wall Decorating Tips from Laura Gaskill: An Art-Buying Guide for Beginners

By:  February 8, 2013
Starting a collection of art that speaks to you is a worthy goal, but it may seem out of reach … and more than a little confusing. Where do you begin? What is the difference between an original work, a limited-edition print and a poster? Where do you shop for art — especially if you don’t have thousands of dollars to spend on a single piece? We will tackle these questions and more in this handy art-buying guide, including resources for collecting on a smaller budget.

Explore your taste. Before diving in and making a purchase, spend some time getting to know what sort of work you respond to. Make weekend dates to browse local art museums and galleries, pick up an art magazine or flip through a stack of art books.

Are there certain styles, colors or subjects that draw you in? Do you gravitate toward black and white photography, modern abstract paintings, still lifes? Note what you love. Exploring and observing will build confidence, not to mention expose you to new styles and artists you might never have found otherwise.

Types of Art

Original art (and why it costs so much). Original work includes any art that is one of a kind: original paintings, drawings, sculptures and more. Why the high price? To draw a parallel to the literary world, imagine if J.K. Rowling could sell only one copy of the Harry Potter series — how much do you think that would be worth?

An artist can profit only once from the sale of an original work, such as a painting on canvas; then it’s gone. Even if the work grows in value over time, it is the collector who profits. If you understand that, it makes sense for original pieces to have a higher price than prints or reproductions.

Photo by SFGIRLBYBAY – Browse contemporary home office photos

 

Prints. A true print, while not one of a kind, is still an original work of art. The artist uses any one of a number of methods to create an original image on a surface like wood, rubber, stone or metal, applies color and then creates a print on paper.

Print types include engravings, lithographs, screen prints, aquatints, linocuts and woodblock prints.

Limited-edition prints. If the artist sets a limit for the number of prints he or she will make with a given image, that is known as a limited edition. Of course, today the lines are being blurred, with artists using digital media to create original works, and a piece may be called a limited-edition print even if it was created or reproduced digitally — that is, it’s not one of the types listed earlier.

Term to know: A run includes all prints made from a given work. For instance, “a run of 50” means the artist created 50 limited-edition prints from the original piece.

Posters and reproductions. When an artist creates an original work and reproduces it (usually digitally) without limiting the run, it is a poster, or a reproduction. Posters are a great way to explore art, since they are so budget friendly — once you build up a bit of a collection, you could even swap out art seasonally.

Fine art photography. Since photographs by their very nature are easily reproduced, it is up to the photographer to limit the number of prints created with a certain image. Generally, the fewer prints available, the higher the price.

Where to Shop

By Laura Gaskill – See more Home Design Photos

The basics. There is nothing like seeing art firsthand, especially when you are still training your eye and learning about your taste. Student sales at art schools, auctions, antiques fairs and local galleries are all excellent places to start your search. Use your own judgment and don’t ever feel pressured to buy something.

Finding affordable art. The world of art buying has become much more democratic in recent years, thanks in great part to the influence of online retailers and auction sites offering well-curated art collections, available no matter where you are and at every price point.

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Wall Decorating Tip By Vanessa Brunner: Your Guide to Art Costs and Buying

Wall Decorating Tip By Vanessa Brunner: Your Guide to Art Costs and Buying

By:  Published June 8, 2013

A piece of original art can make a room, be treasured for years and be passed down for generations. And it can be surprisingly affordable or very expensive. Why do some types cost more than others? “Artwork has to be one of the hardest things to price,” says Kate Singleton, founder of Arthound. “There’s no standard framework as there is for a pair of jeans or a bottle of champagne. Major factors come into play.”

The artist, gallery, medium, style and rarity of a piece all can impact how much it costs. And if you come upon a one-of-a-kind work you love, it may be worth just about any price to you.

Interested in using the power of art to power your interior design? Here are three experts’ tips to think about before you shop. …Read More!

 

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Wall Decorating Tip By Brian Patrick Flynn: Make a Big Statement with Oversized Art

 

Wall Decorating Tip By Brian Patrick Flynn: Make a Big Statement with Oversized Art

By: Brian Patrick Flynn Published March 2, 2011

Have you ever fallen in love with a piece of art only to bring it home and find it’s hard to appreciate from a distance? Both I and my wallet are quite familiar with this. Thanks to a $940 mistake involving a gorgeous piece of pop art my toilet got very lucky, as the colorful piece is now perched proudly right above it for everyone to see as they wash their hands. Not exactly what I had in mind back at the gallery.

Something I’ve learned to appreciate is the value of oversized art. From 5- by 9-foot black-and-white photos to 8-foot sculptures, rooms sporting large-scale art prove that bigger is often better. If you’re on the fence about bringing home a particular piece but afraid it will chomp up your entire room and swallow it, take a look at these spaces and think again.

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Wall Decorating Tip By Gabrielle Di Stefano: 7 Unexpectedly Intriguing Places for Art

Wall Decorating Tip By Gabrielle Di Stefano: 7 Unexpectedly Intriguing Places for Art

By: Published on September 15, 2013

Art engages us, stirs our soul and creates debate, but it is often the final piece in a room. Although art is usually saved for last, the right piece of art can tie all the other elements in a space together. When used in a surprising place, art can be thrilling. When we least expect it, a colorful depiction from a child’s imagination in a mudroom or a thought-provoking landscape over a kitchen bench delights us.

Use one of these creative placement ideas to make your much-loved artwork even more enjoyable.

1. Patios. Outdoors may not be the most obvious place for a painting, but if it is well protected from the elements, why not? This bright toucan painting really livens up this porch.

Design tip: When you’re hanging artwork in an area with an 8-foot high ceiling, the middle of the picture should be approximately 5 feet off the floor.

2. Bathrooms. Bathrooms should be places of serenity and luxury. A beautiful piece of art will only enhance that indulgent experience.

Design tip: In wet areas place your artwork under glass to avoid damage from water and steam.

3. Kitchens. It is ideal to have a window at your kitchen sink. But if you don’t have that luxury (or you would prefer the extra cupboard space instead), take photographs of some favorite personal places and have them screen-printed onto glass cabinet doors.

Design tip: Try grouping empty frames, mirrors or family photos. Symmetrical groupings add balance, formality and a sense of calmness.

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