Tag Archives: nature photography tutorials

Nature Photography Tips with Peter Mather: Northern Influence


Nature Photography Tips with Peter Mather: Northern Influence

Published by Travel Yukon on Feb 19, 2015

This series is part of the ‘Yukon Digital Storytelling Project,’ a collection of three original web series told from a uniquely Yukon perspective.

Episode 1: Peter Mather, Wildlife Photographer
Northern Influence episode one begins with an insight into the mind of one of the territories’ most celebrated wildlife photographers, Peter Mather.

The audience is taken on a journey along the Alaska Highway to Kluane National Park. On the way, Peter explains what motivates him and what makes his photo’s unique. The respect for his surroundings and the animals he works with is apparent as Peter works alongside wild sheep, seeking unique images and behavior on the rocky terrain.

As the sun sets on Sheep Mountain, Peter talks about the next trip that he is planning; the biggest trip of his career. The audience is given an insight into what goes into planning such a venture, and the scope of the project Peter is undertaking.

 

 

Nature Photography Tips with Matthew Schwartz : Editing a Bird Portrait


Nature Photography Tips with Matthew Schwartz : Editing a Bird Portrait

Published by Nature Photography Mastery Academy on Jan 25, 2016

In this nature photography tutorial we join nature photographer Matthew Schwartz as he walks us through a behind-the-scenes post-processing session for one of his beautiful fine art bird photographs. As noted in the video, his style is “Artistic Images” not “Documentary Photos” so  he does manipulate elements in the image.

 

Nature Photography Tips with Matthew Schwartz: Editing Bird Portraits

Nature Photography Tips with Matthew Schwartz: Editing Bird Portraits

Published by: Nature Photography Mastery Academy on Jan 25, 2016

In this nature photography tutorial Wildlife photographer Matthew Schwartz walks us  through a behind-the-scenes post-processing session for one of his beautiful fine art bird photographs. As noted in the video, Matthew’s style of photography is “Artistic Images” not “Documentary Photos” so he does manipulate the elements in the photograph extensively.

Nature Photo Quick Tip with Photographer Nick Page: Chasing Snow and Ice

Photo Quickie with Photographer Nick Page: Chasing Snow and Ice

Published on Jan 17, 2017 by: Nick Page
In this nature photography video photographer Nick Page chases snowy and icy scenes after a deep freeze that came though the Columbia River Gorge and Central Oregon. On this photo shoot Nick tests out some new equipment, as well as experimenting with filming in 60fps.

Landscape Photo Quick Tip: Photographing Meadows, Plains, and Prairies

Endless Fences is a black and white landscape photograph that was created on the grounds of Carousel Park located in Wilmington, Delaware. Title: Endless Fences Photographer: Melissa Fague Genre: Landscape Photography

Endless Fences by landscape photographer Melissa Fague

Meadows Plains and Prairies

Wide-open spaces such as meadows, plains, and prairies are some of the hardest landscapes of all to photograph. This is because most often these types of areas lack a point of interest for the view to focus on in the landscape photograph. In most cases, the huge portion of the scene is one of the things you’re trying to communicate in your photograph but most of the time it won’t capture a viewer’s attention. Remember, your viewers need something in the image to which he or she can focus on it’s the way our minds work. So while you’re on the scene of your shoot look at the different elements of that location and use one as it’s point of interest that says something about the location and imparts a sense of scale. As a photographer you don’t want the viewer’s eyes to wander aimlessly through the photo, so use whatever might be available in the scene to lead his or her into the image. These items could be a winding road, a stream, a fence line, patches of stones…anything could work if your perspective is right.

 

Save

Save