Tag Archives: photography tip

Building Your Photography Skills: The Exposure Triangle

There are three major concepts that you’ll need to develop or build upon; technical skills, artistic skills, and personality. Today, we’ll discuss the technical skills you’ll need as a photographer.

There isn’t very much to the technical skills needed of a photographer, it simply revolves around what settings you choose on your camera when you’re about to create a photograph or a series of photographs. That includes: being familiar with your layout of your camera and changing settings for the correct exposure, focusing a sharp photograph, getting the right color of the screen… etc. These are the things you need to understand in order to make your images sharp and properly exposed.

Understanding The Exposure Triangle

The exposure triangle is made up of three components, hence the name. These three components are; aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Learning to control these three camera settings is vital to producing high quality photographs.

photography exposure triangle

Diagram from Photography Life

Aperture

The aperture is simply how big or small the opening of your lens is going to be. It works similar to the pupil of your own eyes. The aperture will open and close to adjust the amount of light you want or need to come through the lens and hitting the sensor when you’re taking your shot. If your scene is dark you’ll need to open the aperture up so more light comes through the lens. When your scene is bright you’ll need to make the aperture smaller in order to reduce the light pass through to the sensor of your camera.

The aperture controls two things; first the amount of light. The aperture also affects the DOF (depth of field) this is the amount of your photograph that is in sharp focus. We’ll discuss DOF in depth later in another posts.

 

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is just like it sounds, it’s the speed that the shutter will remain open in order to let the image be recorded. Typically the shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second. For example, 1/200th,  1/100th or 1/8th  of a second and so on. However, there will be times when you may want to allow your shutter to be open for seconds or even minutes at a time…this is called long exposure. Extremely low light photography, shooting light trails, making object blur (motion photography), or capturing photos of the stars are just a few examples of where this might need a long exposure.

ISO

The third component of the exposure triangle is often the most frustrating to new photographers primarily because it’s easy to visualize like the other two components. With aperture, you can imagine an opening of the lens and with shutter speed, you can visualize it moving faster or slower. ISO on the other hand is a measure of sensitivity of your sensor is to the light.

When you increase the ISO setting on your camera what essentially you’re doing is you’re telling the sensor of your camera that it needs to be more sensitive to light. That means that for the same size opening (aperture), and the same amount of exposure time (shutter speed), you capture more light, and thus achieve a brighter image.

One of the down sides to a higher ISO is that with the higher sensitivity to light you also have a chance of generating what is called digital noise (unwanted grain or speckles of color) in your photographs. Camera manufacturers have greatly improved on this and many new cameras are capable of shooting at very high ISOs with minimal noise, however it is still worth mentioning.

It’s easy to talk about each of these three components of the exposure triangle individually, but when you’re out on location taking your photographs, it’s not good enough to only know or think about just one of them. The key is to learn how each one affects the other two and how to balance out all three at the same time in order to create the exact photograph you envisioned.

One thing that I found helpful while out shooting are these reference cards, they came in especially handy when I couldn’t get a WIFI signal in whatever location I was photographing.

There are also a few other key technical settings you’ll need to know and understand before heading out to go shooting. In the next article we will discuss White Balance and why it is so important.

Disclaimer:

This blog article contains affiliate links, meaning if you purchase something though these links I will receive a small commission for my recommendation from the store you made the purchase through. If you would like to learn about affiliate marketing and monetizing your own blog or website this is the training course I took.

How Your DSLR Camera Works(1)

How Your DSLR Camera Works

A digital camera may sound complicated but they are actually very simple mechanical devices which are comprised of a few parts. For a standard DSLRs, there is the camera body with a lens that attaches to it. Your camera body contains all the parts needed to capture and process a photograph right inside; the lens is a simple canister with the optional glass which you use to focus your photograph onto the sensor in the back of the camera body.

 

These two simple components, the body of the camera and the lens, work together like this:

Light comes through the opening in your lens and glass. When you are looking through the viewfinder you are seeing a reflection from a mirror and prism inside the camera body.  The mirror reflects that light up through a prism (similar to a periscope) at a 45 degree angle and through the viewfinder to your eye, so you can see the scene that you’re about to capture and record on to the camera sensor.

When you press down on the shutter release button to take your shot, the mirror will flip up out of the way and the lens adjusts to the chosen aperture. The shutter flaps in the back of the camera body then opens allowing the light to shine through to the camera’s sensor in the very back of the camera body which creates your photograph.


At the same time the camera is saving the photo to your SD Card. Once the shot is complete the mirror returns back to the original position and it’s ready to shoot again. This can all happen in less than a millisecond depending on what you have your setting on…the longer the exposure time the longer the shutter stays open to record the image.

Mirrorless cameras work a little differently, obvious from the name, they do not have a moving mirror system.

Instead, what you see when looking through the viewfinder is a live feed of exactly what the image sensor is processing. This allows you to see things like DOF (Depth Of Field), exposure, White Balance and more, before you even take the shot. When you press the shutter release button of a Mirrorless camera, the lens adjusts to the chosen aperture, the shutter opens and the photograph is saved to your memory card.

Now that you have a better understanding of how your camera captures an image for you. There are three major concepts that you’ll need to develop or build upon; technical skills, artistic skills, and personality. In the next article we’ll start developing your technical skills as a photographer.

Disclaimer:

This blog article contains affiliate links, meaning if you purchase something though these links I will receive a small commission for my recommendation from the store you make the purchase through. If you would like to learn about affiliate marketing and monetizing your own blog or website this is the training course I took.

 

Photography 101 Tips: Star And Milky Way Photography

Star And Milky Way Photography – How To Turn Your Boring Photos AWESOME With Lightroom!

Published on Dec 18, 2016 By: YuriFineart

In this Lightroom tutorial we’ll learn how to take a flat and boring RAW file of the stars and turn it into a colorful, dynamic photograph full of interest. We will also see all of the techniques, sliders and tools all the way from the RAW file to the finished and fully edited photo!

Photography 101 Tips: How to Create STUNNING Sunset Photos

How to Create STUNNING Sunset Photos – Adobe Lightroom 6 cc Landscape Photography Editing Tutorial

Published on Mar 20, 2016
By: YuriFineart

“In this video I will share all of my secrets and techniques that I use when editing a sunset photo. Instead of going for the classical orange look, I will focus on getting a great variety of colors and a overall dynamic picture. Keep in mind that my main focus was to show all of the tools in lightroom and explain them rather than going for the perfect look, also, I get why most people would consider this overdone, even I think it is a bit over the top to be honest. You don’t have to go as far as I have gone however, with any of the adjustments, you can go halfway or even just a quarter as far and use the adjustments you find fitting for your photo & editing style.”

Photography 101 Tips: Seascape Photography Waiting For the Right Moment

Since the weather is warming and travel to the beaches is about to begin, I figured I would start sharing more helpful tip on shooting seascapes.

The Colors of Evening on the Beach is a beautiful landscape photograph of the sun setting over the bay of Cape Hatteras as the waves washed ashore. The image was created with a long shutter speed to blur the movement of the clouds and waves. Then the image was enhanced in post production to reduces the remaining details of the scene leaving only the soft pastel colors of the sunset and the soft gradient flow of colors above and below the horizon line. Title: The Colors of Evening on the Beach Photographer: Melissa Fague Genre: Landscape Photography Item ID Number: LAND-0135Waiting For the Right Moment

The sea is a place of wonder, peacefulness, drama and a variety of moods. One of the most exciting things about nature and landscape photography is the challenges of the changes in our world, especially with seascapes and our inability to control what will happen when we are shooting a seascape. For a nature and landscape photographer, you can produces a variety of work that showcases all of the stunning beauties of the sea and the emotions all from the same location; this is especially helpful when learning the art of photography. When shooting a seascape everything in the scene can be taken in consideration when you are composing your photograph; people, rocks, the sands, the sky and most importantly the light. The light will help you convey the mood of the scene you are about to photograph.

Kissed by the Sea is a stunning long exposure landscape photograph of the sun rising over the sea and beach. This photograph was created on the shore of Cape Hatteras in the Outer Banks, North Carolina. The long exposure allowed the rough waves of the ocean to soften slightly while turning the seafoam into a rolling mist across the sandy beach and around the ruins of the dune crossing steps that once stood on the shore. The main section of the dune crossing steps was washed out a few years back during a strong hurricane that hit the coastline of the Carolinas. Most of the Outer Banks were damaged by that storm. Main colors of this photograph are vivid yellow, blues and white. Title: Kissed by the Sea: Traditional Color Photographer: Melissa Fague Genre: Landscape Photography Item ID#: LAND-0130If you are serious about seascape photography, you need patience and watch how the sea changes in front of your eyes. Be on the lookout for changes in the weather and the tides; take note of how the light is changing these elements. Light has three basic qualities: intensity, direction and color;  all of these qualities are affected by the time of the day. When the features match your vision of the scene or story you want to communicate in your photography start shooting.

A beautiful landscape photograph of the rippled sandbars that were visible at low tide at Cape Henlopen State Park during sunset. This image won second place in the Delaware Beach Life Photo contest and was on published in the Oct 2013 edition of Delaware Beach Life Magazine. Title: Sandbars Photographer: Melissa Fague Genre: Landscape Photography

A beautiful stormy landscape photograph of a warped dead tree on a beach cove in Woodland beach Delaware on a heavily overcast day. Title: The Cove Photographer: Melissa Fague Genre: Landscape PhotographyA landscape photograph of cloudy day on the empty boardwalk at Rehoboth Beach Delaware. Photograph created by Melissa Fague.

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About the Photographer:

Me

Melissa Fague is an emerging nature and landscape photographer from Bear, Delaware USA. In just a few short years her work has been published over two dozen times and she has won multiple national and international awards for her beautiful photographs. Her most recent accomplishment is her first published photograph in an international publication with a worldwide distribution, “Landscape Photography Magazine”. Melissa is passionate about the art of photography and nature. Exploring areas and creating photographs is her form of stress relief and art therapy, but she also loves to share her visions so that others can enjoy. Her goal is to one day be ranked among the most famous nature photographers in the world. All of Melissa’s nature and landscape photographs are available for purchase, visit Pi Photography and Fine Art.

Join our VIP List for exclusive offers, notification for upcoming events and more. To read Melissa’s full story on how she became a nature and landscape photographer please visit: In the Beginning.

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